Servant LeadershipMeet the Officers of the Church

Our church leadership balances the concerns of the individual, the congregation, and the broader church so that the headship of Christ is faithfully represented.

Our church leadership balances the concerns of the individual, the congregation, and the broader church so that the headship of Christ is faithfully represented.

Our leadership is made up of pastors, elders, and deacons who are called and equipped of God to oversee the church and to shepherd its members. Click on an article below to find out more:

We practice biblical church government which can be described as Reformed or Presbyterian. This form of organization seeks to balance the concerns of the individual, the congregation, the leadership, and the broader church so that the headship of Christ is fully represented at all levels of the church.

Governing the Church by Elders

Presbyterianism uses what we might call a "team ministry" in which men, ordained as elders, shepherd the church as equals. This avoids the problem of independency and congregationalism, which can often lead to the rule of the majority. By checks and balances this approach provides mutual accountability and avoids an oppressive hierarchy that is found in some churches.

Presbyterianism is a old pattern of church government going back to the early days of church history. It is similar to the form of government set forth in the United States Constitution, probably because much was taken from the Presbyterian system.

Although church government, we admit, is not essential to salvation, principles of church order are a part of divine revelation and therefore cannot be overlooked. How can the whole counsel of God be conserved if a scriptural government is not established and maintained?

An examination of the main principles of the biblical pattern of church government in the time of the apostles shows that it was Presbyterian. The central feature of this system of ecclesiastical government is that Christ is the only head of the church and He has given unique gifts to "presbyters" or elders to shepherd His flock. The following six principles characterized biblical church government:

  • The only Head of the Church was the Lord Jesus Christ.
  • There was a plurality of elders in each Church.
  • The office of a bishop and an elder was identical.
  • The office-bearers were chosen by the people.
  • Ordination was the act of a presbytery or classis—that is, of a group of elders, not an individual.
  • There was the privilege of appeal to the assembly of elders; the power of government was exercised by them in their associate capacity.

A comparison of the three forms of government practiced by various Christian denominations—Prelacy, Independency, and Presbyterianism—shows that Prelacy conforms to none of the above principles; Independency to only three; while Presbyterianism conforms to all six.

Covenant Reformed Church therefore is under the oversight of the pastors, elders, and deacons who meet together as a Consistory (elders and deacons), and the elders who meet together as the Spiritual Council. The both meet once a month.

Worship Times

Sunday School, 9:00 a.m.

(Not held during June-August)

Sunday Morning Worship, 10:00 a.m.

The Lord's Supper, 1st Sunday

Sunday Evening Worship, 6:00 p.m.